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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 155-161

The relation between chronic rhinosinusitis and sleep-disordered breathing


1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kobri El-Kobba Military Hospital, Cairo, Egypt
3 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, El-Maadi Hospital, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Yasser F El-Beltagy
31 Hassan aflaton st Cairo egypt
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejo.ejo_60_18

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Background Chronic sinusitis is one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses affecting persons of all age groups. It is an inflammatory process that involves the paranasal sinuses and persists for 12 weeks or longer. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) on sleep-disordered breathing. Patients and methods This study was conducted prospectively during the period spanning from June 2017 to June 2018 on 100 patients with CRS who attended to the ENT Departments of El-Maadi Armed Forces Medical Complex, Kobry El-Kobba Armed Forces Medical Complex, and El-Demerdash Hospitals. An additional 10 control patients were included in the study. All these patients gave informed consent to participate in this study. Results As regards apnea–hypopnea index, a comparative study between preoperative and postoperative measurements revealed a nonsignificant difference (P>0.05). As regards snore index and snore episodic measurements, the comparative study between preoperative and postoperative measurements revealed a highly significant decrease (P<0.01). As regards sleep efficiency and minimal and basal oxygen saturation measurements, the comparative study between preoperative and postoperative measurements revealed a highly significant increase (P<0.05). Conclusion Surgery decreased snoring and Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores, increased sleep efficiency and minimal and basal oxygen saturation measurements without changes in the apnea–hypopnea index, and improved sleep quality.


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